Youngki Hong

Experimental Social Psychologist

About

profile.jpg

Hello everyone! My name is Youngki Hong and I am a 6th year PhD student in the Social Perception Lab (PI: Dr. Kyle Ratner) at UC Santa Barbara, and an incoming postdoctoral associate in the Social Cognitive and Neural Sciences Lab (PI: Dr. Jonathan Freeman) at New York University. My research draws on theories and methods from social psychology, cognitive and computational neuroscience, and artificial intelligence to understand psychological and neural bases of stereotyping and prejudice. My dissertation research focuses on how group membership influences the way we encode, mentally represent, and evaluate faces of people who belong to our group (ingroup) vs. those who do not (outgroup). Most recently, I show that arbitrary category labels commonly used to create ingroup/outgroup distinctions in many social psychology experiments can actually imply characteristics that influence various intergroup responses above and beyond mere ingroup favoritism. You can read it here.

Before coming to UCSB, I completed my undergraduate degrees in psychology and statistics at University of Minnesota, Twin Cities in 2015.

In my free time, I enjoy working out, going to the beach, hiking, playing video games, listening to music and podcasts, watching the NBA (go Timberwolves!), cooking, and coding for fun. I am also always looking for good vegan food, coffee, and beer.

Please feel free to contact me via email or Twitter. You can also download my latest CV here.


Recent news

  • January 28, 2021: Youngki accepted a postdoctoral associate offer to work with Dr. Jonathan Freeman at NYU starting in September 2021!

  • June 26, 2020: The manuscript “Minimal but not meaningless: Seemingly arbitrary category labels can imply more than group membership” was accepted for publication at Journal of Personality and Social Psychology!

  • May 18, 2020: Youngki received Charles G. McClintock award from the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at UCSB!


Publications

  • Hong, Y., & Ratner, K. G. (2020). Minimal but not meaningless: Seemingly arbitrary category labels can imply more than group membership. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Online First Publication. [pdf]

  • Welborn, B. L., & Hong, Y., & Ratner, K. G. (2020). Exposure to negative stereotypes influences the representations of monetary incentives in the nucleus accumbens. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 15(3), 347-358. [pdf]

  • Hu, C., Yin, J., Lindenberg, S., Dalgar, I., Weissgerber, S. S., Vergara, R. C., Cairo, A. H, Čolic, M. V., Dursun, P., Frankowska, N., Hadi, R., Hall, C. J., Hong, Y., …, & IJzerman, H. (2019). Data from the Human Penguin Project: A cross-national dataset testing principles from social thermoregulation theory. Scientific Data, 6(1), 32. [pdf]

  • Ratner, K. G., Kaczmarek, A. R., & Hong, Y. (2018). Can over-the-counter pain medications influence our thoughts and emotions? Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 5(1), 82-89. [pdf]

  • IJzerman, H., Dalgar, I., Weissgerber, S. S., Vergara, R. C., Cairo, A. H, Čolic, M. V., Dursun, P., Frankowska, N., Hadi, R., Hall, C. J., Hong, Y., …, & Lindenberg, S. M. (2018). The human penguin project: Complex social integration buffers human core temperatures from cold climates. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 37. [pdf]

  • IJzerman, H., Čolic, M. V., Hennecke, M., Hong, Y., …, & Lindenberg, S. M. (2017). Does distance from the equator predict self-control? Lessons from the Human Penguin Project. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 40. [pdf]

Manuscripts Under Review/In Preparation

  • Hong, Y., Auten, A. R., Reed, M., & Ratner, K. G. (invited resubmission). The self as a representational base: Evidence that “us” looks like “me”. Psychological Science*

  • Hong, Y., Maitner, A., & Ratner, K. G. (under review). Effects of American politics on how people within and outside the United States view each other: Insight from California and the United Arab Emirates.*

  • Hong, Y., Auten, A. R., & Ratner, K. G. (in prep). Inductive potential of category labels moderates intergroup discrimination in minimal group contexts.

  • Hong, Y., Mayes, M. S., Munasinghe, A. P., & Ratner, K. G. (in prep). Examining N170 differences in perception and anticipation of ingroup and outgroup faces.

*Unpublished manuscripts that are currently under review are available upon request via email


Presentations

Oral Presentations

  • Hong, Y. (October, 2020). Intergroup face processing: Insight from the minimal group paradigm. Brown bag presented at the UCSB Social Psychology Area Meeting, Santa Barbara, CA.

  • Hong, Y. (March, 2020). Exposure to political rhetoric during the 2016 U.S. presidential election shifted American and Arab people’s mental images of each other. Brown bag presented at the UCSB Social Psychology Area Meeting, Santa Barbara, CA.

  • Hong, Y. (April, 2019). Overestimators are not underestimators: Novel category labels are meaningful when visualizing ingroup and outgroup faces. Brown bag presented at the UCSB Social Psychology Area Meeting, Santa Barbara, CA.

  • Hong, Y. (May, 2018). The relationship between core body temperature and intergroup bias. Advances in Social Thermoregulation Research: Doubts, New Directions, and Innovations. Paper presented at the annual meeting of Association for Psychological Science, San Francisco, CA.

  • Hong, Y. (February, 2017). Effects of exposure to political rhetoric on intergroup biases among American and Arab people. Presented at the symposium for Social Psychological Perspectives on the 2016 Election, Santa Barbara, CA.

Selected Poster Presentations

  • Hong, Y., Mayes, M. S., Munasinghe, A. P., & Ratner, K. G. (April, 2021). Neural responses to anticipating vs. encoding minimal ingroup and outgroup faces. To be presented at the annual meeting of the Social and Affective Neuroscience Society, Virtual Conference.

  • Hong, Y., & Ratner, K. G. (February, 2020). The role of ambiguity in intergroup face perception. Presented at Social Cognition preconference of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, New Orleans, LA.

  • Hong, Y., Maitner, A., & Ratner, K. G. (February, 2020). Exposure to political rhetoric during the 2016 elections shifted American and Arab people’s mental representations of each other. Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, New Orleans, LA.

  • Hong, Y., Mayes, M. S., Munasinghe, A. P., & Ratner, K. G. (May, 2019). Examining N170 encoding bias in intergroup face processing with multilevel modeling. Presented at the annual meeting of the Social and Affective Neuroscience Society, Miami, FL.

  • Hong, Y., & Ratner, K. G. (February, 2019). Overestimators are not underestimators: Novel category labels are meaningful when visualizing ingroup and outgroup faces. Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Portland, OR.